Drone Video of Nightcap Series Race 2

Nick Reid (in conjunction with Stig Osterberg) captured some great aerial video of last Saturdays race.  There are three clips all of which can be seen below.  Lots can be learned by studying them carefully.  Thanks Nick and Stig!

It helps most if you remember the very light and shifty breeze and see how boats use it to advantage (or not). For a sense of scale (and speed?) the yellow tetrahedrons are less than 1/2 mile apart.

 

 

 

 

By |2018-10-07T11:34:59-07:00October 2nd, 2018|On the Water, Racing on the Bay|0 Comments

Summer Cat’s Paw Series – Race 7

Race 7 was scheduled as a “make-up” should we not be able to run six successful races in the regular series to permit a throw-out of each boat’s worst performance.  This year we had six completed races but had not celebrated the series with a BBQ as tradition dictates.  As the RC tends to loiter around the Boat Haven Friday evenings (needs to get a life) we went out for a race.  The only ingredient missing was the wind.  Occasionally a 2.5 kt breeze would spring up (with gusts to 3) but never from the same direction.  So the RC spent an hour frustrated and fretting while the fleet patiently used the time to socialize and bond.  One boat reported being able to sail completely round the committee boat – but didn’t mention if it was all on the same tack.

Not wanting to be late for the BBQ, as is usual for the RC, the race was called around 18:50.  Ironically, as the N flag was raised the wind filled in solidly from the NW.  Too late for a race but at least it helped everyone get back to their moorage in time for the party.  Thanks to Steve, Dean and Tulip it was great.

The Race Committee would like to congratulate the series winners and thank everyone for not noticing (or at least not commenting upon) the occasional confusion and errors by the RC.

NOTICE:- The Dog Days races have been moved from Fridays to Wednesday and merged with the Ed Barcott series.  There will not be any regular RC support or recording of results.

The next regular series (the Fall Nightcap) starts Sunday September 18 th at 13:00.

NOTICE, NOTICE:- Don’t forget the Bush Point distance race this Saturday, July 30 th., Noon start from City Dock, report your own finish time.

ALSO:- The Ted Pike Memorial Race August 20 th. at Noon (details to follow, but it involves a Keg of Rum).

AND:- The Thunderbird Regional Regatta September 3 – 4.

By |2016-07-24T11:53:35-07:00July 23rd, 2016|On the Water, Race Reminder, Racing on the Bay|0 Comments

Weather looks promising for Smith Island Race tomorrow

National Weather Service Forecast

EAST ENTRANCE U.S. WATERS STRAIT OF JUAN DE FUCA-
857 AM PDT FRI MAR 25 2016

SAT
SE WIND 5 TO 15 KT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT.

SAT NIGHT
S WIND 5 TO 15 KT BECOMING W 15 TO 25 KT AFTER
MIDNIGHT. WIND WAVES 1 OR 2 FT BUILDING TO 2 TO 4 FT.

Mostly cloudy with a high of 55 and 0% chance of rain.

See the distance race page for more information.

By |2019-01-21T20:15:20-07:00March 25th, 2016|Club News, On the Water, PHRF, Race Reminder|0 Comments

Sailing Off to Wild Places

A video record of Ashlyn and Russell Brown’s sailing trip on JZERRO to Haida Gwaii and the west coast of Vancouver Island along with Alex Spear on VITA DUMAS. Well worth heading over to the PT Watercraft site to read the entire post.

This last June and July, Russell and I sailed our multi-hull from Port Townsend to Haida Gwaii/Gwaii Haanas park (also known as Queen Charlotte Islands) and back down the west coast of Vancouver Island.

There is really no way to accurately describe what it was like for me, or the feeling that we dropped off into another world for a wonderful but all too brief period of time. “What does one do in absolute wilderness?” This was a question asked by my adult daughter. “It’s more about being there.” I finally said, but I lacked for words and still do.

post continues here

By |2016-01-01T14:24:24-07:00January 1st, 2016|On the Water|0 Comments

Castaway Accused of Eating Crewmate

Sometimes racing seems all consuming. From the Daily Beast.

hungry-sailor

A man who spent 438 days at sea after his boat was overpowered by a strong storm is being sued by his crewmate’s family—who accuse him of eating the junior sailor to stay alive. Salvador Alvarenga has said that crewmate Ezequiel Cordoba, 22, died on their vessel after he gave up, and that he kept Cordoba’s body aboard for six days for company. But days after Alvarenga’s new memoir was published, Cordoba’s family said Alvarenga was only able to survive by eating their son. “I believe that this demand is part of the pressure from this family to divide the proceeds of royalties,” Alvarenga’s lawyer said. “Many believe the book is making my client a rich man, but what he will earn is much less than people think.”

story continues here

By |2015-12-15T10:01:03-07:00December 15th, 2015|On the Water|0 Comments

POINT WILSON, The Greeter Light

A post from Saltwater People Historical Society by way of Three Sheets NW.

Point Wilson Lighthouse, Port Townsend, Washington. From the archives of the S.P.H.S.©

“There was much fanfare when Point Wilson Lighthouse was established at the west side entrance to Admiralty Inlet and Puget Sound in 1879. Its strategic location was near the bustling seaport town of Port Townsend, which was in those years targeted for the major shipping center for that corner of the world. Sailing vessels and steamers ran in and out of the port with regularity, and next to San Francisco, no port had a more boisterous and sinful waterfront that did old Port Townsend. Houses of ill repute were numerous and the shanghaiing of sailors and drifters was a day to day occupation for both runners and grog shop owners.

Every navigator entering or departing Puget Sound had to take Pt. Wilson into his reckoning if he didn’t want to strike an obstruction lurking under the salty brine. When the weather was clear one could properly give the point a wide berth, but the culprit was fog, and when it settled over the local waters, sailor beware. Unfortunately, for three decades after settlement of the area, mariners rounded Pt. Wilson without the assistance of either a guiding light or fog signal, rather incredulous when one considers the importance of the major turning point from the Strait of Juan de Fuca into Admiralty Inlet.

Pressure of the most determined variety finally got action from the Lighthouse Board to press Congress for funds, and on 15 December 1879, the beacon became a reality. It was a light of the fourth order, and to alert ships in foggy periods, a 12-inch steam whistle was installed.”

Story continues here

By |2015-10-19T14:29:22-07:00October 19th, 2015|On the Water, Port Townsend|0 Comments