From Timber To Tide

From Timber To Tide from Pixillion on Vimeo.

This film documents Ben Harris’ love of wood work and boat building, how he acquired his skills, and how incredible it is to be able to take something that you’ve built with your own hands out onto the water and sail it across the sea.

Who is Ben Harris?

Ben has always loved wood. His mother said that his first word was ‘log’. He has been working with wood throughout the UK since the age of 15. First as an assistant to a cabinet maker, where he started by sharpening the tools and clearing up. He then developed his skills in furniture making and his passion for wood and forestry by working in broadleaf woodlands. Later he tuned his skills in bespoke oak-framed carpentry and went on to establish a sawmill and oak framing business in Scotland, sourcing timber from the local estates. In 2005 Ben moved to Cornwall to study boatbuilding. He has been building boats and sailing them ever since.

Thanks, Jak, for the tip.

By |2015-12-28T12:49:08+00:00December 29th, 2015|In the Yard|0 Comments

Current Status of Port’s Stormwater Response

Post from the Port of Port Townsend website.

Photo from Port of PT website

Photo from Port of PT website

As [the Port of PT has] communicated previously, the Port of Port Townsend is currently in the midst of a Level 3 environmental response to the WA State Department of Ecology. This is the highest level of response, and reflects the serious nature of the level of contaminants entering our stormwater system. Our continued ability to run a boatyard in Port Townsend is dependent on our ability to reduce contaminant levels.

There are two primary issues we are addressing:

  • Cleaning up contamination that has built up over the years
  • Preventing present and future contamination

Cleaning up contamination that has built up over the years

Over the many years of operations at the Port’s Boat Haven facility, contamination has built up to levels that now exceed state standards. The Port has an underground water retention system that stores up to 50,000 gallons of water, in various vaults, in much the same way as a septic tank. When stormwater runs into that tank, solids settle to the bottom. After nearly 20 years of accumulation, that sludge needs to be cleaned. That sounds easy, but it is far from it. Finding a home for the water (which is not free of contaminants) is a complex issue, as is the actual removal of the sludge.

story continues here

By |2015-05-01T11:49:02+00:00May 1st, 2015|In the Yard, Port of Port Townsend|0 Comments

Doug Lockhart Retires After 31 Years at the Port

From the Port of PT

Doug Lockhart retires after 31 years at the Port of PT

Doug Lockhart retires after 31 years at the Port of PT

After a nearly 31 year career at the Port of Port Townsend, Doug Lockhart is preparing to make his final haul out as Hoist & Yard Manager, retiring at the end of February.

Join us at Doug Lockhart’s Retirement Party!
Friday, February 27, 2015, 4:45 at the Pourhouse.
Snacks and cake. No-Host Bar!

The Port Townsend native got his start in the marine trades with Skookum Marine, building decks and working on bodywork on fiberglass boats. As Skookum’s business began to wind down, Doug learned of an opening at the Port.

Back then, the hiring process was extensive:

“Gus (Gustafson – The Port’s harbormaster) threw the application at me and said ‘you’re hired!’

post continues here

By |2015-02-20T08:33:36+00:00February 20th, 2015|In the Yard|0 Comments

Jefferson County Annual Moorage Tenants Union Meeting

A recent post on the Jefferson County Moorage Tenants Union website made the assertion that under the current Port of Port Townsend plan for 2015 the monthly moorage fee for a 25′ slip would increase from $182.67 to $203.26, an increase of 11.3%. Are you Interested to know if this computation and the possible reordering of priorities to move the construction of a new boat ramp over a rebuild of C & D docks are in next year’s plan? Ask Bertram Monday night, November 7th.

Annual Moorage Tenants Union Meeting

Monday Nov. 17 7:00 PM

Marina Room, Point Hudson

With the Port of Port Townsend budget coming to a vote in two weeks, you can find out what issues will affect you in the next year.

JC Moorage Tenants Union meeting Agenda:

1. The Port rate increase proposal

2. Pending Infrastructure projects and the priority matrix

3. Boat Haven Restroom renovation

4. The facts behind the boat ramp expansion

THE MARINA ROOM IS LOCATED on the north side of the Shanghai Restaurant.

By |2014-11-13T14:48:25+00:00November 13th, 2014|In the Yard|0 Comments

Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding Holds Auction Nov. 8th

If you’re a little bored this weekend and happen to be kicking it around the Quimper Peninsula, or if you’re on the hunt for surplus boats and boatbuilding materials of the most serious kind, the Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding in Port Hadlock will be holding a public auction in Port Hadlock on Saturday, November 8.

The auction will be held in the fabric shelter building on the upper part of the campus, above the waterfront shops. It’s a live auction and although the building will open at 9 a.m. so you can peruse the goods, the real action will kick off at 10 a.m. when the auctioneer starts rattling off the bids.

The items up for bid are a collection that put Seattle’s now-defunct Second Wave marine surplus store to shame. There is the usual variety of heads, nautical books, random artwork and bungee cords. But there are also a compelling variety of the sorts of hand and shop tools that bring boats off paper plans and bring them to life.

Bandsaws, planers, lathes, compressors, drill presses and welders are all going up on the block. If your needs figure more to the post-production aspect of boat ownership, you might be covered there, too — in addition to an array of small power and hand tools, two brand new generators and a 7 h.p. gas pump will be available. So will a few anchors (although you could potentially use some of the massive shop tools as anchors, that’s not recommended. Real actual boat anchors designed for the purpose will be there).

story continues on Three Sheets Northwest or at the Boat School site

By |2014-11-06T09:14:58+00:00November 6th, 2014|In the Yard|0 Comments

2014 Pittman Innovation Awards

Sail Magazine’s annual innovation awards with some interesting new products.

The BG-Zeus MFD can show laylines.

The BG-Zeus MFD can show laylines.

Sailing has always been a technology-driven activity, and the spirit of innovation that prompted the first Stone Age sailor to cast off and let the wind do the work remains as vibrant today as ever. Of course, many of today’s innovations harness the now commonplace “miracles” that are part and parcel of the modern era. Nonetheless, a surprising number are the product of good-old common sense, the kind of thing that prompt you to wonder, “Now why didn’t I think of that?”

Named after Freeman K. Pittman, SAIL’s long-time technical editor who died of Lou Gehrig’s disease in 1996, the Pittman Innovation awards recognize outstanding new products created by a sailing industry that remains forever fresh in its thinking. As in years past, our team of judges—executive editor Adam Cort, cruising editor Charles J. DoaneJay Paris is a veteran naval architect and SAIL‘s long-time technical editor, Ben Ellison is SAIL‘s electronics editor and owns the marine electronics web site, www.panbo.com and editor-at-large David Schmidt—roamed many boat shows, both in the United States and abroad, to uncover the best of the best in the realm of sailing gear. We think Freeman, once again, would have been impressed by what his fellow sailors have come up with.

story continues here

 

By |2014-02-27T12:43:26+00:00February 27th, 2014|In the Yard|0 Comments

3M Scotchloks, is my Love so Wrong?

Some ideas on dealing with the very small gauge wires that are used on many new electronics. From Ben at Panbo.

3M_Scotchlok_UYbx_connector_test_cPanbo-thumb-465xauto-8486

In October I promised to eventually discuss the 3M Scotchlok IDC connectors I used to tap into Gizmo’s engine gauge wires in order to install an Actisense EMU-1 Engine Monitoring Unit. Given that two experienced commenters already strongly dismissed these connectors for boat use, I did more research and testing. Tentative conclusion: while 3M does indeed state that Scotchloks like those tiny UY butt connectors above are meant only for 22-26 gauge solid copper conducter wires, they still seem like the fastest, surest way I’ve seen to splice the fine gauge stranded wires we often deal with afloat. Could it just be a mistake that’s kept a lot of useful Scotchlok models out of 3M’s limited marine line, or did I miss some major difference?

Let’s start at the beginning. What you need to make a lasting wire splice in the boating environment is sufficient mechanical contact between the conductors, a strong connection between the two wires so the contact isn’t broken by vibration or other physical abuse (probably abetted by some form of strain relief), and some sort of protection so that the contact surfaces don’t corrode and fail.  The classic first class solution is carefully installed crimped heat shrink connectors as deeply detailed by our friend RC Collins of Compass Marine.

article continues here …

In October I promised to eventually discuss the 3M Scotchlok IDC connectors I used to tap into Gizmo’s engine gauge wires in order to install an Actisense EMU-1 Engine Monitoring Unit. Given that two experienced commenters already strongly dismissed these connectors for boat use, I did more research and testing. Tentative conclusion: while 3M does indeed state that Scotchloks like those tiny UY butt connectors above are meant only for 22-26 gauge solid copper conducter wires, they still seem like the fastest, surest way I’ve seen to splice the fine gauge stranded wires we often deal with afloat. Could it just be a mistake that’s kept a lot of useful Scotchlok models out of 3M’s limited marine line, or did I miss some major difference?

Let’s start at the beginning. What you need to make a lasting wire splice in the boating environment is sufficient mechanical contact between the conductors, a strong connection between the two wires so the contact isn’t broken by vibration or other physical abuse (probably abetted by some form of strain relief), and some sort of protection so that the contact surfaces don’t corrode and fail.  The classic first class solution is carefully installed crimped heat shrink connectors as deeply detailed by our friend RC Collins of Compass Marine.

– See more at: http://www.panbo.com/archives/2013/12/3m_scotchloks_is_my_love_so_wrong.html#sthash.wAFwOd59.dpuf

By |2013-12-30T11:18:39+00:00December 30th, 2013|In the Yard, Uncategorized|0 Comments

School takes on ‘mystery boatbuilding adventure’ for BBC

Story by Deborah Bach from Three Sheets Northwest

Emma3

Master boatbuilder Jeff Hammond, second from right, oversees students as they frame a replica of the 16-foot Emma Dean, one of the Whitehalls used by John Wesley Powell in his 1869 descent of the Colorado River. Photos courtesy of the Northwest School

The Northwest School of Wooden Boatbuilding recently wrapped up work on three of its more unusual boats — replicas of the Whitehall rowboats used in John Wesley Powell’s groundbreaking 1869 expedition on the Colorado River.

The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) commissioned the school to build the boats, one 16 feet and two 21-footers, for a reenactment of the voyage that it plans to film in August.

It was a plum gig for the nonprofit school but also a challenging one, since there are no complete descriptions or photos of the boats available, and only a few references about them in the surviving journals and records from the expedition.

“There are no plans,” said Pete Leenhouts, the school’s executive director. “Nobody had plans in these times. That’s not unusual.”

story continues here

By |2013-06-14T07:32:04+00:00June 14th, 2013|In the Yard, Uncategorized|0 Comments

Calculations for I.F. Mariner

If you’re interested in what’s happening in the yard at PT’s Boat Haven, the PT Shipwrights Co-op blog is a good place to start.

Naval Architect and Marine Engineer, Jonathan Moore, is working on the I.F. Mariner design project for Port Townsend Shipwrights Co-op.  I visited him in his office at Tim Nolan Marine Design.  He is determining the best size and placement of the large fish hold bulkhead in order to meet stability guidelines.  You may recall a previous blog post about I.F. Mariner where a 3,000 lb. cement block was moved to various locations on the I.F. Mariner to run stability tests.  Now Jonathan is referring to line drawings of the vessel to make further calculations in combination with his Auto-CAD software.  He will project how far the vessel enters the water’s surface when the fish hold is up to it’s hold capacity.

As well, last week the original engine was removed from the I.F. Mariner via crane and the new engine prepared for installation.  A runway was rigged up in order to smoothly remove and install the engines in and out of the engine room.  Next the shipwrights will seal up the engine room.

ifm

story continues here

By |2013-05-14T08:44:23+00:00May 15th, 2013|In the Yard|0 Comments